Could Japan Have Been Cursed by the “SuperMoon?”

On March 19, Earth’s moon will be at its closest point to our planet in 18 years, a mere 356,577 kilometers away. The event, also called a lunar perigee, was dubbed a “supermoon” by astrologer Richard Nolle back in the 1970s. The term is used to describe a new or full moon at 90% or more of its closest orbit to Earth. On the 19th it will be at 100%.

Nolle warns Earth’s inhabitants to prepare themselves during the “supermoon risk window,” which ranges from March 16 – 22. During this time, Nolle claims there will be an increase in supreme tidal surges, magnitude 5 or higher earthquakes, and even volcanic activity.

Perhaps his “supermoon risk window” should have started a little earlier to prepare Japan for the earthquake, tsunami and volcanic activity it just experienced.

According to the US Geological Survey (USGS)  website where they have all the significant earthquakes of 2011, you will find that 72.7% of them fall in the risk windows predicted by Nolle. The Christchurch earthquake happened on the last day of a supermoon window. The Haiti earthquake even happened in one of the time windows in his 2010 forecast, that was published the year before.

Looking back in history, there were Super (full) Moons in 1955, 1974, 1992, and 2005. All of these years had their share of extreme weather, but was it just coincidence or was it caused by the Moon? It is already known that the moon does have impacts and affects on the Earth such as lunar tides, but does the SuperMoon cause an increase in extreme weather?

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